icon

Get The Answers You Need Here

Looking to learn more about the Lifestyle Coach Training Program, or looking for an organization wide training?
We offer discount pricing for multiple people.

Contact Ami Bolles for more information.

Ami Bolles
Phone: 515-558-5023
Email: abolles@telligen.com

Are Lifestyle Coaches required to receive training?

CDC-recognized organizations are responsible for ensuring that an adequate and well-trained workforce is available prior to launching a first class. All Lifestyle Coaches must be trained to the specific curriculum being used by the recognized organization before offering their first class. The recommended minimum length of formal training for new Lifestyle Coaches is at least 12 hours or two days. Formal training is defined as training conducted by one of the four methods listed in Section III of the 2018 DPRP Standards, found here: https://nationaldppcsc.cdc.gov/s/article/DPRP-Standards-and-Operating-Procedures-2018.

How do I get trained as a Lifestyle Coach?

Training entities that provide formal training to a CDC-approved curriculum are listed on the following resource, Training for your Lifestyle Coaches. These entities are not officially endorsed by CDC; however, they sign a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) agreeing to train to a CDC-approved curriculum and to provide training nationally or regionally to organizations recognized by CDC. These entities further agree to provide quality training aligned with the 2018 DPRP Standards, which should help ensure competent Lifestyle Coaches. In addition to the training entities listed on the CDC website, training may be provided by:

  1. a private organization with a national network of program sites,
  2. a CDC-recognized virtual organization with national reach, or
  3. a Master Trainer.

CDC may conduct random quality assurance assessments of any program, recognized organization, or Master Trainer providing formal training for Lifestyle Coaches to ensure that training requirements are being met. Please feel free to contact any of these entities and inquire about training and pricing/scheduling.

Does the CDC certify training entities?

CDC does not certify or accredit Lifestyle Coach training entities. CDC-recognized organizations implementing the National DPP lifestyle change program should participate in training conducted by one of the four methods listed in section III of the 2018 DPRP Standards, found here: https://nationaldppcsc.cdc.gov/s/article/DPRP-Standards-and-Operating-Procedures-2018.

How is formal training for Lifestyle Coach defined?

Formal Lifestyle Coach training is defined as training conducted by one of the following four methods listed in the Standards:

  1. a training entity that has an MOU with CDC and is listed on the CDC website,
  2. a private organization with a national network of program sites,
  3. a CDC-recognized virtual organization with national reach, or
  4. a master trainer.
Does CDC maintain a registry of Lifestyle Coaches?

CDC does not maintain a registry of Lifestyle Coaches, as CDC grants recognition at the organizational level, not the coach level. Also, the CDC does not collect personally identifiable information on Lifestyle Coaches. Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program (MDPP) suppliers should refer to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) web page for information collected and maintained on Lifestyle Coaches, as there are some additional requirements over and above those required for CDC recognition. (https://innovation.cms.gov/initiatives/medicare-diabetes-prevention-program/)

Does CDC provide continuing education units (CEUs)/credit for Lifestyle Coaches?

CDC does not provide CEUs for Lifestyle Coaches working within CDC-recognized organizations. Please contact your training entity to inquire about education credits.

How is Lifestyle Coach eligibility determined?

Individuals eligible to be Lifestyle Coaches must have been formally trained to a CDC-approved curriculum for a minimum of 12 hours, or approximately two days; by one of the following:

  1. a training entity listed on the CDC website
  2. a private organization with a national network of CDC-recognized program sites
  3. a CDC-recognized virtual organization with national reach
  4. a master trainer, as designated by the CDC-recognized program, who has delivered the lifestyle change program for at least one year and has completed a Master Trainer program offered by a training entity on the CDC website. While Lifestyle Coaches may have credentials (e.g., RDN, RN), credentials are not required. Community health workers and lay people can be effective coaches as well.
How often do Lifestyle Coaches interact with participants?

Regardless of delivery modality (i.e., in-person, online, distance learning, or as a combination modality), it is expected that CDC-recognized organizations will have Lifestyle Coaches who provide individualized feedback to program participants throughout the duration of the yearlong lifestyle change program. Lifestyle Coaches may supplement in-person sessions with handouts, emails, or reminder texts, although none of these may be the sole method of participant communication.

Program Details

NDPP Training Home

icon

Curriculum

Prevent T2 Curriculum Training

Learn More

icon

Delivery

Programs Delivered To Your Preference

Learn More

icon

Registration

Interactive Training For Your Coaches

Learn More

icon

More Information

Get The Answers You Need Here

Learn More

Image 01 Image 02